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Yugen Blakrok – House of Ravens

“The underground has historically been a place where artists and musicians hone their craft before emerging onto the mainstream, however in today’s age, where the term Hip-Hop can mean a variety of things to a variety of people, it has become a subgenre of its own, a place some artists choose not to leave… But rather remain, perfecting their craft forever.

Yugen Blakrok has been on the South African Hip-Hop scene for the last decade or so. Originally hailing from the Eastern Cape, and after featuring on various projects throughout SA, she began rocking mics in Johannesburg in 2007 in a crew called Recess Poetry, which quickly gained a strong following throughout JHB…”

More info

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Jarred & Displaced: Christoffer Relander & Anders Lönnfeldt

Photography by Christoffer Relander:

“In this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, on the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.
With analog multiple exposures I’m able to manipulate my photographs in-camera—this project was not created or manipulated in an external software such as Photoshop.

Very cool result! Read more here.

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Cotton Road – a documentary film about a global supply chain

Cotton Road moves “from dirt to shirt,” exploring every step of textile production from cotton farms in South Carolina to factories in China.

Really enjoyed this documentary film exploring the cotton/clothing manufacturing supply chain, and the people employed at different stages in the process.

Click through to Vimeo for additional clips.
Website here: http://www.cottonroadmovie.com/

Video

Phonobellow

International Contemporary Ensemble | Zosha Di Castri and David Adamcyk: Phonobellow (2015), WORLD PREMIERE from ICE on Vimeo.

“Zosha Di Castri and David Adamcyk’s Phonobellow, an hour-long new music theater work for five musicians, electronics, and large-scale performative installation, is the result of this collaborative process. Taking as their starting point the year 1877, Di Castri and Adamcyk explore how Muybridge’s high-speed camera and Edison’s phonograph have marked human perception. Via a heterogeneous assemblage of music, images, recorded texts/sounds, electronics, movement, sculpture, and lighting, the piece seeks to capture how deeply these inventions reverberated with people at the time, and continue to reverberate to this day.”

I saw this the other day and it was an experience – exciting, energetic, and unpredictable. Composed by Zosha Di Castri and David Adamcyk, performed by the International Contemporary Ensemble. More information here.

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Scott Walker + Sunn O))) – Brando – Film by Gisèle Vienne

Filmmaker Magazine writes:

Accompanying the first track of the anticipated collaboration, Soused, between avant-garde crooner Scott Walker and sludgy noisemeisters Sunn O))) is an arresting short film by French director and choreographer Gisèle Vienne. Walker’s music — with or without Sunn O))) — is the stuff of waking nightmares, and Vienne’s dream-like film matches it fuzzed-out chord by fuzzed-out chord. A house in the mountains, a blonde-tressed woman moving in slow-motion epilepsy; a teenage boy (her son?) locked in tremulous horror; a car crash?; and a sudden appearance by French novelist, theater artist and dominatrix Catherine Robbe-Grillet… it’s eerie, disquieting, and, with its narrative elisions, entirely hypnotic.

Additionally: NYT article on the album, focusing on Scott Walker. Red Bull Music Academy “lecture” with Stephen O’Malley from Sunn O))).

Quote from the NYT piece:

“Once a romantic hero, then an existential one — blond, narrow-hipped, unsmiling behind sunglasses — Mr. Walker no longer has a stage persona. He hasn’t performed in public since a television appearance in 1995, and hasn’t played a concert since 1978. Whatever his music is now, it’s not pop. He’s a composer who happens to use his voice, a semi-operatic baritone pushed to high and quivering extremes, as an instrument to serve his meticulous texts, which on the new album, “Soused,” include words like “bliaut” — a 12th-century European overgarment — and “bescumber.” (Look it up.) And maybe something else: a maker of abstract dramas with tones as characters. His work demands that you come more than halfway toward his isolation, his need to do things differently, and perhaps his story of turning from light to dark.

I would argue that “Soused,” which comes out Oct. 20 on the 4AD label, might be the first music Scott Walker has made in a very long time — maybe since his contributions to the Walker Brothers’ final record, “Nite Flights,” in 1978 — that can be absorbed into the body and enjoyed as a thrill, without needing to learn a lot of other context about his aesthetic transgressions, without attending to the Myth of Scott. Rather than withholding musical or emotional payoffs, which has long been his way, there’s a sort of constant payoff here: no orchestra this time, but the steady electric-guitar and bass drones of Sunn O))) (simply pronounced sun), rich and distorted and marvelous.”